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Service Stations

Service station owners, designers and developers should be aware that AS 1940:2017 includes changes which affect the design, operation and maintenance of service stations.

AS 1940 is significant in that it forms the basis of many of the Australian State/Territory regulations that govern the design, installation and management of UPSS at Australia’s 6,700 service stations.

TFA Project Group was heavily involved in reviewing the drafts (along with WorkCover), and provided multiple submissions to the Standards Committee. Based on TFA’s review of the third draft released in January 2017, notable changes from 2004 to 2017 for retail service stations will include:

  • Underground tanks must have a high-level alarm set at 97% capacity (5.3.3) (this is significant for networks that normally don’t specify ATG)
  • Where service stations are in close proximity to sensitive places, consideration should be given to preventing potential large spills impacting the sensitive facilities. (5.3.2)
  • Consideration should be given to reducing the speed of vehicles entering dispenser areas (7.3.2)
  • Interceptors and separators must hold minimum 50L spill (7.3.3)

Note the final version is subject to change including clause references. TFA will endeavour to provide an update soon after the release.

 

Fuel Terminals

Fuel terminal operations, engineering and maintenance staff should be aware that AS 1940:2017 includes changes which affect the design, operation and maintenance of their fuel terminals and related storage facilities.

AS 1940 is significant in that it forms the basis of many of the Australian State/Territory regulations that govern MHF (major hazard facilities) and other bulk terminals that store flammable and combustible liquids.

TFA Project Group was heavily involved in reviewing the drafts (along with WorkCover) and provided commentary to the Standards Committee. Based on the third draft released in January, notable changes from 2004 for fuel terminals include:

  • New definitions for normal fill level, tank capacity and tank rated capacity (1.4.6)
  • Combustible C1 definition now aligned with GHS Flammable Category 4. Liquids with flash point 93-150°C now C2 instead of C1. (1.4.9)
  • Work Health & Safety Act Legislation Safety data sheets terminology now in AS1940. (1.4.43)
  • Polyethylene and composite tanks now permitted for minor storage (2.2.5.2)
  • Where tanks contain differing classes of liquid, all section five provisions shall apply to the lowest flash liquid point (5.1)
  • Site constructed vertical tanks (category 6) must have independent high-high level alarm with setting based on risk assessment, and should not provide less than 10 minutes response time. (5.3.3)
  • All above ground or underground tanks must have a high-level alarm set at 97% capacity (5.3.3)
  • Tank bund capacity calculation increased to maximum of 25% of total stored in all tanks or 110% of largest. (5.8.2)
  • Bunds for flammable tanks filled via Ship or Refinery pipeline shall have a vapour sensor and consideration given to an overfill pipe to grade (5.8.3)
  • Separate bund capacity provision required for “containment of fire water resulting from the management of a site emergency.” (not 20 minutes as it was in the 2004 version) (5.8.7)
  • Secondary contained combustible liquid tanks permitted up to 200kL at prescribed mine sites (5.9.2)
  • API600 gate valves accepted as fire rated without certificate (6.3.3)
  • Where a vehicle can stand while refuelling, interceptors and separators must hold minimum 50L spill (7.3.3)
  • Horizontal tanks (above ground) shall be internally inspected at least every 15 years (9.17.1)
  • Continuity testing for loading earthing and bonding shall be carried out every 12 months (9.18.3)
  • Significant increase in fire hydrants needed for package stores with much lower storage quantity triggers (Table 11.3)
  • Mutual aid shared firefighting water supplies permitted subject to authority approval (11.3.4)
  • Operator exposure radiant heat limit for access to fire monitors reduced from 4.7kW/m2 to 3 kW/m2. (11.5.7)
  • Fire hose reel required on the shore for marine refuelling berths (11.9.2)
  • A fire hydrant system is now required for a tank of any size within a building (11.11.1)
  • All outdoor storage tanks of any size (containing flammable or C1) must have a fire hydrant system (11.11.3)
  • Hydrants can no longer be used for cooling water – permitted options monitors and cooling rings (11.13.4 and 11.15)

Note the final version is subject to amendment including clause references. TFA will endeavor to provide an update soon after the release of the new version.

 

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TFA Project Group specialise in AS 1940 compliance. For a full list of the changes, or to discuss how the changes will affect your next fuel storage project, please contact TFA Project Group today.

Telephone – 1300 794 300
Email – enquiry@tfa.com.au

Website – www.tfa.com.au

Get in touch for your project today